JOURNAL OF GENTRY
GENEALOGY
Volume 3 Issue 7
July 2003
Home Page and Index

ALLEN D. AND NANCY GENTRY


A Scandalous Family


by
Willard Gentry

Abstract
Allen D. Gentry of Monroe County, Tennessee, his wife of many years, Nancy Gentry, and his mistress, then wife, Susan Ivy are described. Proposals for and descriptions of the composition of the families of eight children of Nancy's and four children of Susan's. Verbatim transcriptions of court documents are given in a supplementary file.

Introduction
Allen D. Gentry, of Halifax County, Virginia, Surry County, North Carolina and Monroe County, Tennessee, had a very checkered career in the later stages of his life. Married to his first cousin, Nancy Gentry, Allen put her aside and took up with a widow, Susan Ivy, whom he put in Nancy's place in his home, and later was accused of forgery in an attempt to get Nancy to agree to a divorce. The sins of the father were visited upon his children. One daughter, Nancy, was a child bride who was abandoned by her husband. A son, John, ran off with the widow of John's brother, David, leaving behind a wife of his own and five children. A grandson, Pinkney, was indicted for murder. Despite all this, most of the children of both Nancy and Susan survived their trials and tribulations to become accepted members of their community.

Allen D. Gentry


Allen was the second son of Meshack Gentry, one of the "Biblical Brothers" - Shadrack, Meshack and Abednego - sons of Allen-III and Mary Gentry (Allen-III's family is described in detail in an earlier issue of "Journal of Gentry Genealogy"<1>). Allen D. was born about 1789, probably in Halifax County, Virginia. His mother's name was Ann, maiden name unknown. (We have no clue in any records as to what the "D" in Allen's name stands for - probably "David", either for Meshack's uncle, David Gentry, or Allen Sr.'s close associate in Lunenburg County, Virginia, David Allen. He was always referred to simply as "Allen D".) Allen D. had an older brother, Pleasant, and a younger brother, Jordan. There have been suggestions, including that in "The Gentry Family in America"<2>, that Meshack had several daughters. The one piece of evidence that might bear on this, a 1782 state census of Halifax County, shows only five members in his family<3>. The next census in which Meshack appeared was in 1800 in Surry County, North Carolina, at which time there were no daughters in his family<4a>. The conclusion is that Meshack had no daughters.

Allen D. moved from Halifax County, Virginia, to Surry County, North Carolina, with his father in about 1796. He was living with his father at the time of the 1800 census, then was married to his first cousin Nancy Gentry in 1810 (a marriage bond dated 2 Mar 1810, is found in Surry County records<8>). Allen and Nancy subsequently appeared in the 1810 Surry County census<4b>, then were missing from any 1820 census. In 1830 and thereafter, the family is found in the census records for Monroe County, Tennessee<4c,d>.

Allen's name began appearing in the tax lists of Surry County in 1810, when he was taxed for 50 acres of land. His name is found in the tax records a half-dozen times after that until 1817, when the last entry was made<5>. Entries in Surry County deed books show Allen D. sold a portion of his land in 1819, and at the same time witnessed the sale of land by his father<6>. Although there is a deed for the sale of 254 acres of additional land in 1821 (for which he was taxed in 1817), it is probable that this sale occurred after Allen D. and Meshack moved away from Surry County. During these last few years of Allen's stay in Surry County, there is also a passing reference to him in court records in 1818 and 1819 as an administrator for the estate of Richard Gentry, an uncle of Meshack Gentry.<7> [In following the successive references to the Allen Gentrys in Surry County, care must be taken when Allen is not specifically identified as "Allen D.", to distinguish between Allen D. and an older Allen, a first cousin of Allen D.'s father Meshack, and a younger Allen, a younger brother of Allen D.'s wife Nancy.]

In a Revolutionary War pension application, Meshack indicated that "A few years after the end of the war, he moved to Surry County, NC where he lived until 1818. Then lived 2 years in Greene County, TN, 2 years in Bledsoe County, TN, 2 years in McMinn County, TN, then finally moved to Monroe County, TN where he resided until the time of his application."<9> We presume that Allen D. accompanied his father in these moves, except possibly for some delay in the first move to Greene County. Regardless, the next record of Allen was in Monroe County, where there were a number of references to both Allen and Meshack in the county deed books<11>. Both Meshack and Allen appeared in the 1830 Monroe County census records. Meshack has not been found in the 1840 census, even though he did not die until 4 Jul 1846. Allen and various members of his family appear repeatedly in Monroe County census records from 1840 onwards.

Nancy Gentry


Before we get into the problems between Allen D. and his wife, Nancy, we need to comment briefly on her background. Nancy was born about 1785, in Virginia according to the 1850 census records, but there is some uncertainty as to this. [Allen and Nancy's children, in the 1880 census, report them variously as: both born in Virginia, both born in North Carolina, and both born in Tennessee, so there is nothing to be learned about their birthplaces there.] Nancy's father was Abednego Gentry, a younger brother of Meshack, and her mother is believed to have been Elizabeth Brooks. The family's residence at the time of Nancy's birth was undoubtedly along the border line between Halifax County, Virginia, and Caswell County, North Carolina, but where exactly he was living is not known. In any case, the family was living in Person County (separated from Caswell County in 1791), at the time that Abednego moved, in about 1808, from Person to Surry County, North Carolina. There, as we have indicated above, Nancy met Allen D. Gentry again (she must have known him as a young child before Meshack left Virginia) and married him.
 

The Infidelity of Allen
Our knowledge of the next stage of Allen D.'s life comes from court documents<12>, mostly from the testimony of Nancy in a suit filed in Chancery Court in 1854 against Susan Ivy and the administrator of Allen's estate (who died in 1853) in which she sued to overturn an earlier divorce decree and claimed legal inheritance of Allen's estate. In 1839, according to Nancy, Allen's relationship began with a neighboring lady, Susan Ivy, about whom more information is given below along with information about her children. Nancy claimed in 1854:

"Her said husband abandoned her entirely and lived in adultery with one Susan Ivy whom he had placed in a house about one hundred and fifty yards distant from the cabin occupied by [Nancy]. Thus forsaken by her said husband, [she], ignorant, poor and defenseless was forced to submit to all manner of cruel treatment from her said husband who was now under the complete control of the said Susan Ivy with whom he was living in adultery. " As to the timing of this event , Nancy's memory may be a little faulty, since in the 1840 census, Susan was listed in what is apparently her own home with apparently four children (two by her former husband, and two by Allen), while Allen and Nancy and four of their eight children were listed in a separate household. Be that as it may, Nancy testified further in court that "her said husband allowed her [Nancy], to remain in a house upon his land and permitted her to come to the mill and carry off a small pittance for her support."

 

In 1845, Allen and Susan were indicted by the Monroe County, Tennessee, Circuit Court for "lewdness", and in order to free himself of this charge, Allen "set about perpetrating frauds of almost every kind upon [Nancy] in order to fraudulently dissolve himself from the bonds of matrimony." Nancy claimed later that a letter which she received from a brother-in-law in Surry County, (telling her that her father [Abednego] had died and that she was to inherit a part of his estate), was a forgery. Nancy stated that the forgery was arranged by Allen, and was designed to get her to agree to a divorce from Allen. Further, this letter gave her to understand that she, Nancy, would inherit large sums of money herself if she were divorced from Allen, but that otherwise, as her legal husband, the money would go to Allen. Nancy was told that:

"[She] would be placed upon a piece of land that she could hold in fee simple where she would not be molested if she would ... consent not to oppose her said husband from obtaining [a] divorce. [Further..] [She] distinctly charges and alleges that her consent not [to] oppose her said husband from obtaining a divorce, was given in the manner she has stated and that her signature to said petition for divorce was obtained by fraud and contrivance and that she never did ask to be divorced from her said husband at any time except in the manner she has stated."

A decree of the Circuit Court was issued dated 12 Jan 1846<12>, granting Nancy a divorce from Allen, following which on 1 May 1848, "there was a false and pretended marriage between the said [Allen and Susan Ivy] ... but [Nancy charged] they were not in fact married legally ... that they reported themselves married to effect the dismissal of the ... indictment that was still pending against them in the Circuit Court." Nancy's later claim was that the alleged marriage was performed by a Philip Alexander [a next door neighbor] who was not authorized to perform such a marriage" (and thus any children of Allen and Susan were not legally entitled to inherit any of Allen's estate at his death).

The letter to which Nancy referred in her court suit is among the papers filed with the other court papers in Madisonville, Monroe County, and the text of both the letter and the court brief is given in a Supplement to this article<16>. It was purported to have been written by Samuel Stock, the husband of Nancy's older sister, Mary, who was living in Surry County. [The letter provides the only evidence of the date of Abednego's death (31 Oct 1844). This date may not be correct but it must have been sufficiently close to what Nancy would be expected to know concerning her father's death, that she did not recognize the letter at the time of its receipt as a forgery.]

The court papers do not report the decision of the court - whether the letter was indeed proved to be a forgery or whether or not Susan and Allen were legally married - but the fact remains that all further court proceedings and considerations of inheritance of Allen's estate involved only the children of Allen and Nancy. There is no mention of any inheritance by the children of Allen and Susan. Accordingly we must presume that the court found in Nancy's favor in entirety.

Nancy and eight children (or their minor heirs in the case of one son David who had died), were named in several subsequent court actions as heirs of the estate of Allen D. Gentry (see further references in footnote 12). In December 1856, it was acknowledged in court that Susan Ivy Gentry had died. Finally, Nancy died in 1862. Both Nancy and Allen D. are buried in Hawkins Cemetery, near Madisonville, Monroe County, with no dates on their gravestones<13>. Nancy's will was proved in 1862 and her estate distributed, and the final sorry episode of the Allen - Nancy - Susan triangle came to an end.

Children of Allen D. and Nancy


We have discussed at considerable length the marital problems of Allen and Nancy. It is time now to go back and discuss the rest of the family. There has been some controversy as to Allen and Nancy's children, but the court proceedings of the 1850's and 1860's fairly firmly fix the family as being composed of eight children. The census records for Allen and Nancy for 1850 and 1860<13a> help to establish these children. The details relating to the families of these children can be established to a considerable extent by these census records, marriage records<10> and the court records relating to their inheritance of Allen's and Nancy's estates. We shall use what we have available to discuss each of these in turn, in order of their age.
 

1. Pleasant M. Gentry

– Born probably early 1811, Surry County, North Carolina
– Married (1) (speculation) about 1829, to (Unknown).
– Married (2) 18 Mar 1836, Blount County, Tennessee, to Jane Cottrell, born about 1809.
– Married (3) 25 Dec 1874, Monroe County, to Mary Ann Blye, born about 1821.
 Presumed children of Pleasant and First Wife (all born in Monroe County, Tennessee):
  i (Speculation) (Son), born about 1830.
  ii Amanda Gentry (speculation), born about 1832, married 14 Sep 1849, Monroe County, to William McLemore.
  iii Wesley Gentry (speculation), born about 1833; married 26 Jan 1851, Monroe County, to Nancy Alexander.
  iv Margaret Gentry, born about 1834.
  v Mary (Polly Ann) Gentry, born about 1835; (speculation) married 11 Mar 1850, Monroe County, to Jacob W. Mullins.
 Presumed children of Pleasant and Jane Cottrell:
  vi Rebecca Gentry, born 5 Apr 1837, died 2 Feb 1923; married 22 Nov 1856, Monroe County, to William McLemore. [added 1/19/2007]
[Note. McLemore family bible records provide the birthdate for Rebecca. The assumption of his descendants has been that Rebecca was a sister of William's first wife, Amanda, and that she married William shortly after Amanda's death. The William McLemore family has not been found in the 1850 census, nor does Rebecca appear there. It is quite possible that Rebecca, then aged 13, may have been living with her sister at the time of that census.]
  vii Salena Gentry, born about 1840.
  viii James Pinkney Gentry, (STB)* born 18 Mar 1842, (STB) died 1930, Grainger County, Tennessee; married 18 Aug 1864, Monroe County, to Rebecca Kimbrough
  ix Gilford/Guilford Gentry, born about 1841.
  x Joseph A. G. Gentry, born about 1845; married 7 May 1874, Monroe County, to Sarah A. Harrison.
  xi Cynthia O. Gentry, born about 1860
  xii Thomas A. Gentry, born about 1864.
  xiii James R. Gentry, born about 1871
 Child of Pleasant and Mary Gentry:
  xiv Jane Gentry, born about 1876
* (STB = "said to be", second-hand data, not verified)

Pleasant was living with his parents in Monroe County, Tennessee, at the time of the 1830 census and is listed in his own right in the 1840 and subsequent census records<4d,13b>. From the composition of Pleasant's family as shown in the census records of 1840 and 1850, it is apparent that his marriage to Jane Cottrell must have been a second marriage for Pleasant. From the ages of their children, Pleasant and this first wife may have married shortly before 1830, and in fact Pleasant's wife probably was the unidentified female present with Allen and Nancy's family in the 1830 census.

The relationships of the family living with Pleasant in the 1840 census are not clear. Our suggestions are highly speculative, and are based on a combination of census records, and marriage records<10> that can most easily be explained if the author's assumptions are right. The oldest female present in the census (age 15-20) was much younger than the age reported in 1850 and 1860 for Jane, so either Jane's age was reported in error, or Jane was missing from the census for some unknown reason and this was another person. The young lady was too old to be Pleasant's daughter, but the author believes it may have been his sister, Malinda Jane, who appears to be missing from her parents' listing. Three of the other proposed children of Pleasant, namely Amanda, Wesley, and Mary were of an appropriate age to fit the census, and explain marriages of Gentrys who otherwise have no logical explanation. The 1850 census listing for Pleasant's family is as expected, with the exception that Margaret, who is thought to be a daughter of Pleasant, was not living with his family, but instead was living with her grandfather Allen [and a daughter Rebecca may have been living with her sister, Amanda McLemore]. The Jacob Mullins who married Pleasant's daughter Mary was a brother of the A. J. Mullins that married Pleasant's sister, Nancy. The youngest four children of Pleasant are found in the 1880 Monroe County census.

The 1860 census listing includes a "Pinkny" that is believed to be not the James Pinkney who was a son of Pleasant, but instead was Pinkney Burton Gentry, a half-brother of Pleasant and a son of Allen Gentry and Susan Ivy. This is discussed in considerable detail in a footnote, as well as the circumstances surrounding the indictment of a Pinkney Gentry for murder<15>.

2. James Riley Gentry

 – Born about 1818, perhaps in Greene County, Tennessee, buried in Hawkins Cemetery near Madisonville, Monroe County, Tennessee (with no dates on gravestone)<14>.
 – Married to Louisa Catherine (Unknown), probably in about 1838, no record of marriage found. Catherine's tombstone is marked "Catherine E", born 3 Oct 1817, died 4 Jun 1885
 Children of Riley and Catherine (all born in Monroe County):
  i Jane Gentry, born about 1839
  ii Nancy C. Gentry, born about 1841; married 2 Jan 1868 to Atlas Overstreet Crowder.
  iii John A. Gentry, born about 1842; drowned Jul 1860 [1860 Monroe County Mortality Schedule].
  iv Charles A. Gentry, born about 1844; married 27 Jan 1867 to Jane Williams.
  v Riley Ellison Gentry (known as Ellison), born about 1848, (STB) died 8 Jul 1937; married (1) 5 Aug 1866 to Manervy/Minervy ("Nearvy") Williams; (STB) married (2) 24 Sep 1885 to Margaret Jane Bluford.
  vi Peggy Ann Gentry, born about 1850
  vii Louisa Gentry, born about 1852.
  viii Elizabeth Gentry, born about 1854.
  ix Harden Gentry, born about 1858.

The census records for this family are straight forward<13c>. Riley was listed with his parents in 1830, then with his own family in 1840, and succeeding Monroe County census records up to 1880. Charles, and Ellison have separate listings in the 1880. Peggy Ann is included in her parents' record in 1880, but with a married name of Jenkins and a young son. Three of the children of Riley and Catherine are included in the Monroe County marriage records.

3. John A. Gentry

 – Born about 1819, and like Riley he may have been born in Surry County, North Carolina or Greene County, Tennessee. John is said to be buried in an unmarked grave near Rockport, Tennessee, before 1880.
 – Married (1) about 1836 to Mary (Polly) Sims/Simms. She was deserted by her husband; there is no record of any divorce.
 – Married (2) 9 Apr 1864, Macon County, North Carolina<8>, to Mary Mullins Gentry, widow of John's brother David. Mary is said to be buried in Knoxville, Tennessee.
 Children of John and Mary (Polly) Sims Gentry:
 i Elizabeth ("Betsy" or "BJ") Gentry, (STB) born 5 May 1838, (STB) died 26 Dec 1927, Vonore, Monroe County.
 ii James Gentry, born about 1841; (STB) married 30 Aug 1879, Blount County, Tennessee, to Harriet Keller.
 iii Pleasant Gentry, (STB) born 1 Jan 1844, (STB) died 10 Dec 1913, Maryville, Blount County, Tennessee; married 15 Jan 1866, Monroe County, to Matilda Mitchell.
 iv Mary Gentry, born 15 Aug 1845, died 1 Aug 1883 (according to her gravestone inscription in Hawkins Cemetery, near Madisonville, Monroe County.
 v Allen Gentry, born about 1847, (STB) died Knoxville, Tennessee.
 Children of John and Mary (Polly) Mullins Gentry:
 vi John Gentry, born 1850, Hamilton County, Tennessee.
 vii Charles Gentry, (STB) born 13 Oct 1862, (STB) died 18 Aug 1889, Hamilton County, Tennessee; (STB) married 23 Apr 1881, Blount County, Tennessee, to Matilda Madison; two other marriages.
 viii Katie Gentry, born about 1863
 ix Cynthia Gentry
 x Samuel Gentry, born about 1865

In about 1848, John abandoned his wife Mary Sims and their five children and ran off with another Mary, the widow of John's younger brother David who had died shortly before. The first Mary continued to live in Monroe County, while John and the second Mary moved first to North Carolina, then back to Blount County, Tennessee. John continued his contacts with his siblings after leaving Monroe County. In 1859, he gave a power of attorney to E.C. Hawkins to receive his share of his father's estate which included some 940 acres of land. In 1866, he received from E.C. Hawkins, his share of a payment of money in lieu of land, as specified in his mother's will.

The 1840 census listing for John's family includes a Revolutionary War pensioner, John Simms, age 90<4d>. This was undoubtedly Mary's grandfather. Mary's mother, Milly Simms, was probably also living with them, an estate settlement in 1858 establishing this relationship. When John and Mary Mullins Gentry, along with the latter's children, left John's family, they moved to Hamilton County, Tennessee, and were listed in the 1850 census in that county<13d>. John's abandoned wife, Mary Sims Gentry, along with the latter's children are missing from the 1850 census, but were listed in the 1860 and succeeding Monroe County censuses up to 1880.

Most of the data about Mary Sims Gentry's children comes from private communications from Willie L. Gentry of Mineral, Virginia<15>, who is a descendant of this family. The experience of their desertion by their father must have left both of Mary Sims Gentry's daughters, B.J., and daughter Mary, gunshy and wary of marriage, for both had a number of children out of wedlock. In neither case is there any information as to whether a single individual was the father or whether several fathers were involved. Mary Sims Gentry's son, Pleasant, enlisted in the Union forces during the Civil War. A record of his discharge in Knoxville is dated 30 Nov 1864. His namesake and uncle, Pleasant M. served in the Civil War also, but in the Confederate forces.

4. David Gentry

– Born about 1821, died probably before 1848.
– Married 22 Dec 1840, Monroe County, to Mary Ann (Polly) Mullins.
 Children of David and Mary Mullins Gentry:
 i Adaline Gentry, born about 1843; married Andrew McDonnell.
 ii Margaret Gentry, born about 1846; married 10 Apr 1866, Monroe County, Tennessee to William White.
 iii Nancy Ann Gentry, born about 1847; married (bond dated 19 Aug 1864), Macon County, North Carolina<8>, to Asa B. Mullins (Andrew McDonnell served as bondsman).

The three children of David and Mary accompanied their mother when she ran off with David's brother John, and were present in the 1850 Hamilton County census with John and Mary<13d>. They were represented by their uncle Riley, who was appointed by the court as their legal guardian, in the court proceedings relating to the settlement of their grandparents' estates. It appears that Adaline and Margaret returned to Monroe County eventually, but that the youngest girl, Nancy, stayed with her mother in moving to North Carolina.

5. Malinda Jane Gentry

– Known also as "Jincy/Jincey" or "Ginsey", born about 1824 in Monroe County.
– Married Richard Hawkins, probably about 1845, based on ages of their children.
  Presumed children of Richard Hawkins and Malinda Jane Gentry:
 i Mildred Hawkins, born about 1846.
 ii Rosanna Hawkins, born about 1850.
 iii Samuel Hawkins, born about 1852.

Jane is not listed in the 1850 census, but in a court document dated 1857, reference is made to "Malinda Jincy, dau.; wife of Richard Hawkins of Blount Co." Her mother, Nancy, also refers to Malinda Jane as the wife of Richard Hawkins in her court suit brief. The 1860 Blount Co., Tennessee, census has an entry for Richard Hawkins<13e>, but neither Richard in the family listing is likely to have been Jane's husband. The head of household, Richard, age 77, was presumably the father of Jane's husband (Jane was listed as age 33), while a younger Richard, age 23, was probably a son of Richard's by a previous marriage. The missing Richard is said to have served in Company B, 39th Confederate Mounted Infantry with Pleasant Gentry and been killed in action. His absence in 1860 may have had some relationship to the impending war.

Jane was undoubtedly with Allen's family in the 1830 Monroe County census<4c>. In 1840, Jane was probably living with her brother Pleasant - the girl age 15 to 20 present with the family. This was during the early stages of family turmoil and disruption, and we can speculate that Jane may have preferred to live away from her father rather than have his mistress move into her home.

6. Nancy V. Gentry

  – Born Apr 1825 [per 1900 Meigs Co., TN census]
 – Married (1) 11 May 1840, Monroe County, to William E. Gentry, divorced about 1849.
 – Married (2) 6 Oct 1859, Monroe County, to Andrew Jackson Mullins (born Apr 1833).
 Possible child of Nancy and William E. Gentry
 i (Speculation) Caroline Gentry, born about 1843; married 28 Feb 1857, Monroe County, to George White.
 Children of Nancy and Andrew Mullins:
 ii Joseph Mullins, born about 1869.
 Presumed children of Andrew Mullins by an earlier marriage.
 a John Mullins, born about 1852.
 b Rufus A. Mullins, born about 1854.
 c Millard Fillmore Mullins, born about 1856.

Daughter Nancy provides a different challenge in chronicling the checkered history of Allen and the senior Nancy's family. There have been questions as to whether the Nancy V. Gentry who married William E. Gentry in 1840<10> was the same Nancy as was listed in the 1850 census<13a>, living with her mother, Nancy senior and listed as age 20. If this age was correct, Nancy would have been only ten years old when she married. However, it appears that the 1850 age was given incorrectly for in 1900, in Meigs County, Tennessee, her date of birth is given as Nov 1825. This still means she was only fourteen at the time of her marriage! Was this really the same Nancy, with a child-bride marriage? It seems that it must have been, since her mother, Nancy, in her court suit of 1854, in listing her children for the benefit of the court, included the phrase, "Nancy who was intermarried with a man by the name of Gentry who abandoned her almost as soon as married". This may have been a situation such as we have earlier speculated for Malinda Jane. Maybe this Nancy was so eager to escape from the unwholesome atmosphere in her home in 1840, that she went to any lengths in trying to escape it, including perhaps misleading her husband, William, as to her age. The age situation may well have been part of the reason for William abandoning Nancy.

Who was this William E. Gentry? No satisfactory identification has so far been determined for him. According to D'Andra Holt Smith <13c>, he was in Colorado County, Texas, in 1848 when he was listed in the voter registration rolls for the county, and in the same year he was the plaintiff in a court case in Cass County, Texas against a Nancy Gentry. This suit is believed to have been a request for a divorce, but the court information is incomplete because the Cass County courthouse burned. A divorce was presumably granted, for on 27 Jul 1849, William married Martha L. Hancock in Cass County. William and Martha were listed in the 1850 Cass County census, William being age 33, born in North Carolina. They were listed again in the 1880 Colorado County, Texas, census with William reporting the same date of birth and birthplace. In the latter census, he gives the birthplace of his father as Kentucky, and the birthplace of his mother as North Carolina. Any movement of Gentrys from Kentucky to Tennessee to Texas was very unusual for that particular period in history, and the author has not been able to suggest a reasonable family identification. It appears from the phrasing of the mother Nancy's comments that this Gentry was not closely related to their family, and for example could not have been a son of Jordan Gentry (youngest son of Meshack) as has sometimes been suggested. Such a son would have been a nephew of Allen Gentry, and certainly known to Nancy.

The children of Nancy and A.J. Mullins shown above are given in the 1880 census<13g>. Besides her children by Jackson Mullins, it is probable that Nancy had a daughter, Caroline, by her first husband, William. In the 1850 census, in the senior Nancy's household, there was an unidentified seven-year-old girl, Caroline living with the elder Nancy's two daughters, Nancy V. and Mary. The age for Caroline may have been erroneous as was Nancy's, since she was undoubtedly the Caroline Gentry who married George White in Monroe County on 28 Feb 1857. But Caroline's location in the household with Nancy V. and her approximate age is best explained by the proposal that she was Nancy's daughter.

7. Benjamin Franklin Gentry

 – Born about 1828.
 – Married 10 Mar 1850, Monroe County, to Angeline Alexander (born about 1832).
 Children of Franklin and Angeline Gentry:
 i Louisa J. Gentry, born about 1854.
 ii Charles A. Gentry, born about 1857, Blount County, Tennessee
 iii John M. F. [Millard Fillmore?] Gentry, born 1860, Blount County.

Allen and Nancy's fifth son was known variously as Franklin and as "Doctor F". In 1850, Franklin was listed in Monroe County marriage records as marrying Angaline "Gentry"<10>, but in the same year, he was listed in the census with his mother, Nancy, with an "Angaline Alexander", age 18, living with the family<13a,f>. Both of these entries for Angeline must have been coincidental clerical errors, and should have been interchanged. Angeline was probably a daughter of P.N. and Eliza Alexander who lived next door. [This family included Nancy Alexander, age 20, who was undoubtedly the Nancy who married Wesley Gentry the following year – see Pleasant's family above.] Franklin and Angeline undoubtedly had more children, but these three, from the 1860 Blount County census, are all that are definitely known.

8. Mary (Polly) Gentry

– Born probably late 1830.
– Married 8 Sep 1856, Monroe County, to Ephraim Calvin Hawkins (born about 1820).
 Children of Calvin and Mary Hawkins:
 i James M (N?). Hawkins, born about 1857.
 ii Rebecca Hawkins, born 1860.
 Children of Calvin and a first wife?:
 aN. C. Hawkins (male), born about 1850.
 b Mary A. Hawkins, born about 1855.

The youngest of Allen and Nancy's children was not in the 1830 census with the family, but was undoubtedly the child listed in 1840 as being born 1825-1830<4d>. Mary was living with her mother, Nancy in 1850, and was listed with her husband in the 1860 census<13h>. Polly, a "J.N." Hawkins, and a Nancy Hawkins are buried in the Hawkins family cemetery near Madisonville, Monroe County<10>.

Children of Susan Ivy

 – Born about 1810, died 1856.
 – It is uncertain whether Susan was married to the father of her first children, presumably named Eldridge.
 – Married (2), in 1848 to Allen D. Gentry.
 Children of Susan Ivy and an unknown father or fathers:
 i (Daughter), born before 1830?
 ii James Ivey (?), born 1830 to 1835; said to have married 1851.
 iii Catherine Ellridge/Eldridge, born about 1837.
 Children of Susan Ivy and Allen D. Gentry, all in Monroe County:
 iv Emeline Gentry, born about 1838.
 v William Henry Harrison Gentry, born about 1840.
 vi Pinkney Burton ("Pink" or "PB") Gentry, born 21 Mar 1843, died 12 Nov 1933, Long Beach, California; married 23 Feb 1873, Adams County, Nebraska to Elizabeth Scott.
 vii Rebecca (or Arabecca) ("Becky") Allen Gentry, born 8 May 1848, Monroe County, died 5 Apr 1923, Hebron, Nebraska; married 3 Sep 1864, Monroe County, to Rufus Franklin Gray.

Despite remembrances by Nancy Gentry that her husband Allen brought Susan into his home in 1839, the Ivy family and the Gentry family were reported separately in the 1840 Monroe County census<4d> - Nancy's memory may have been a little faulty, or Susan was living in a separate house on Allen's land. Susan is shown in 1840 without any husband, but with four children. She is included with Allen in the 1850 census<13a>. The little that is known about Susan outside of her relationship with Allen is included in the footnotes<15a,e> in comments by Meg Bookout Gentry, a descendant of Susan's son Pinkney. Two of the children living with Susan in 1840 are believed to have been fathered by Allen. After Allen and Susan's deaths, "PB Gentry" went to live with his half-brother Pleasant and was present in the 1860 census, resulting in there being two Pinkneys for a time of about the same age in the household – a confusing situation<15e>.

Conclusion
The tangled relationships of the families of Allen Gentry, Nancy Gentry, and Susan Ivy, make this a fascinating challenge to sort out. Fortunately, over a period of years, enough evidence has accumulated that we can make a pretty good guess as to composition and activities of the various families involved. There still remain questions, however.

References
1. "Journal of Gentry Genealogy", vol 2, #9, "The Sons of Samuel-II Gentry, Part 4. Allen Gentry and Family". Visit article.

2. Richard Gentry, "The Gentry Family in America", Grafton Press, New York, 1909, p.260, lists for #211. Meshack Gentry, children: Allen D., Jourdan, Pleasant F., Francis, Susan, and Nancy.

3. Bureau of Census, "U.S. Census of 1790", (printed summary of census returns).
Virginia records for 1790 destroyed, state enumerations for earlier years substituted:
Halifax County, 1782.
p. 22   Michael [misspelling of Meshack] Gentry, 5 people.

4. Pre-1850 Census Returns For Meshack, Allen and family.

a. 1800 Federal Census 
Surry County, North Carolina
Page
Born:
/ Sex
1790-
  1800
1784-
  1790
1774-
  1784
1755-
  1774
Bef
1755
 
655Meshack Gentry M
F
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
b. 1810 Federal Census
Surry County, North Carolina
Page
Born:
/ Sex
1800-
  1810
1794-
  1800
1784-
  1794
1765-
  1784
Bef
1765
 
165Meshack Gentry M
F
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
194Allen Gentry M
F
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
c. 1830 Federal Census
Monroe County, Tennessee
Page
Born:
/ Sex
1825-
  1830
1820-
  1825
1815-
  1820
1810-
  1815
1800-
  1810
1790-
  1800
1780-
  1790
Bef
1780
122Allen D. GentryM
F
1
2
2
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
140Meshac Gentry M
F
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
80-90
80-90
d. 1840 Federal Census
Monroe County, Tennessee
Page
Born:
/ Sex
1835-
  1840
1830-
  1835
1825-
  1830
1820-
  1825
1810-
  1820
1800-
  1810
1790-
  1800
Bef
1790
146Pleasant GentryM
F
0
2
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
147Allen D. GentryM
F
0
0
0
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
50-60
147Susan Ivy M
F
0
2
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
195W. E. Gentry M
F
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
195Jas R. GentryM
F
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
196John Gentry M
F
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
>90*
50-60
 * Revol. pensioner, John Simms, age 90

5. Surry County, North Carolina, Tax Lists
Abstracted by the author from original documents in North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Year District / Taxpayer Acres White
Polls
River Course / Remarks
1810 --- Original records missing
(Record from "Undated Records" file, possibly for 1810)
  Captain Martin district
Allen Gentry
 
50
   
1812 Captain Martin district
Allen Gentry
 
50
 
0
 
1813 (Original records transcribed 1944 by Luther Byrd and filed with original record file)
  Capt. Martin district
"Gentry, D. Allen"
 
50
 
1
 
1815 Capt. Martin district
Allen D. Gentry
 
100
 
0
 
Deep Creek adj. Howel
1816 Capt. Swim district
"Gentry, D. Allen"
 
50
 
1
 
Deep Creek
1817 Capt. Spears district
Allen D. Gentry
 
254
 
1
 
Deep Creek

 

6. Surry County, North Carolina, Deed Books

1819 Jan 25 Deed Bk(O-327)
  Meshack Gentry to George Hudspeth 80 ac Deep Creek ... beginning at ford of the Creek at Durham's new corner then to the head of the mill pond then along Philip Halcomb's line to Day's corner, then along Day's line to Martin's corner and along Martin's line, then to and up a branch with Dunham's line, then to and along the road to the beginning. Wit: Allen D. Gentry, Nancy Gentry.
1819Apr 5Deed Bk(O-414)
  Allen D. Gentry to Abraham Creson 15 ac ... on both sides of Hunting Creek commonly known as Walker's Well, beginning at the mouth of Aaron Wooten's spring branch on north side of Creek to the mill road, then on Abraham Wooten's line to an old ford on said Creek on the north of a small branch, then along Creek toward the mill, then across the Creek to the old mill road, then variously back to the beginning including the Shoal plantation on which Samuel Shoal lived. Wit: Ephraim Gough, J. Cowles.
1821Aug 20Deed Bk(R-107)
  Allen D. Gentry to John Castevens 254 ac land on Fox Nobs incl grinding mill ... grinding mill, said land adjoining James Chappel Sr, and Joseph Sparks in the Fox Nobs. Wit: James Morrison, William Collins.
 
7. Agnes M. Wells and Iris M. Harvey, "Surry County, North Carolina, Court Minutes" Vol VI (1815-1819)
1818Nov 10(p.164)
  Administration on the estate of Richard Gentry dec'd is granted unto George Hudspeth with the will annexed who entered into bond with Allen D Gentry and Benedick Castevens in the sum of £800 for his faithful performance as such.
1819Feb 11(p.176)
  Ordered by the court tht the administrators of Rich'd Gentry be authorized to sell the perishable part of said estate etc.

8. North Carolina Marriage Bonds

Surry County
1810 Mar 2 Allen D. Gentry to Nancy Gentry Witness: Shadrach Holcomb
Macon County
1864 Apr 9 John Jenterry to Polly Jentry Bondsman: Andrew McDonnel
Witness: R. C. Slagle
1864 Aug 19 Aise/Asa Mullens to Nancy Gentry Bondsman: Andrew McConnel
Witness: R. C. Slagle

9. Revolutionary War Pension Application
Filed 29 Aug 1836, in Monroe County, TN, by Meshack Gentry, aged 88 years
[Excerpts from application...]

"Enlisted Nov 1779 as a Captain of mounted riflemen at Caswell Courthouse, Caswell Co, NC. Discharged 15 Nov 1781 at Hillsborough, NC. A few years after the Revolutionary War, moved to Surry Co, NC where he lived until 1818. Lived in Green County, TN for 2 years then Bledsoe Co. for 2 years, then to McMinn County, TN for 2 years, then to Monroe County, TN until time of application."
Meshack died 4 July 1846. Allen D. Gentry, son, pursued pension further in 1852.

10. Monroe County, Tennessee, Marriages, 1838 - 1870
(Records before 1838 lost in courthouse fire of 1838)

Date Page Groom Bride
1840 May 11 7 William E. Gentry Nancy V. Gentry
1840 Dec 22 9 David Gentry Mary Ann Mullins
1849 Sep 14 29 Wm McLemore Amanda Gentry
1850 Mar 10 31 B. F. Gentry Angeline Gentry [Alexander?]
1850 Mar 11 31 J. W. Mullins Polly Ann Gentry
1851 Jan 26 33 Wesley Gentry Nancy Alexander
1856 Sep 8 38 E. C. Hawkins Mary Gentry
1856 Nov 22 39 William McLemore Rebecca Gentry
1857 Feb 28 40 George White Caroline Gentry
1859 Oct 6 47 A. J. Mullins Nancy Gentry
1864 Aug 18 57 Pink Gentry Rebeca Kimbrough
1864 Sep 3 57 R. F. Gray Rebeca Gentry
1866 Jan 15 62 Pleasant Gentry Matilda Mitchell
1866 Apr 10 63 William White Margret Gentry
1866 Aug 5 64 Ellison R. Gentry Manervy Williams
1867 Jan 27 67 Charles A. Gentry Jane Williams
1867 Sep 28 70 Thos J. McLemore Mary Jane Gentry
1868 Jan 2 72 Atlas Crowder Nancy Gentry

11. Monroe County, Tennessee, Deed Books and Index
(For purposes of brevity, index entries only are given with the exception of deeds relating to the estates of Allen D. and Nancy Gentry.)

Year Bk/Pg Grantor Grantee Remarks
1827 (A-5) Allen D. Gentry and
Meshack Gentry
William Blair Bill of Sale
1827 (A-64) Allen D. Gentry and
Meshack Gentry
Samuel F. Foute Bill of Sale
  (A-405) M and AD Gentry R. J. Meigs Deed
  (A-659) A and M Gentry John McGhee Bill of Sale
  (A-822) J. B. Gilbreath AD Gentry Deed
1839 (A-1023) Allen D. Gentry John F. Gillespie Deed
  (M-194) AD Gentry Jas. A. Coffin Deed
1834 (N-745) Meshack Gentry son Allen D. Gentry Deed
  (O-125) John F. Grigsby AD Gentry Deed
1849 (O-126) Allen D. Gentry Samuel Henry Deed, land adj Nancy Gentry
  (O-185) J. H. Alexander, Sheriff A. D. Gentry Deed
  (O-187) A. D. Gentry Thos. Crowder Deed
  (P-325) James R. Gentry J. C. Stephens Deed
  (Q-325) Jas. Jones AD Gentry Deed
1857 Jun 3 Deed Bk(Q-406)
  Land of Allen Gentry, dec'd, sold at auction to Samuel Henry by Benjamin Pettit, administrator, pursuant to pursuant to court decree of 3 Jan 1857, the land comprising 400 acres on both sides of Tellico River in NE 1/4 of section 21 and parts of NE 1/4 and SE 1/4 of section 13 [31?] Fractional Township 2, R 4 E, adjoining land of Nancy Gentry. Includes grist and sawmills, dwellings and outhouses and stile house. Title divested out of John A, Polly, James R, Margaret, Nancy, and Susan Gentry, Richard Hawkins and wife Mary Gentry, and B F Gentry, heirs of Allen D Gentry
1859 Sep 20 Deed Bk(Q-240)
  Power of Attorney from John A Gentry of Monroe County, to E.C. Hawkins to receive his part of estate of Allen D Gentry, dec'd
1860 May Deed Bk(Q-327)
  Deed from J R Gentry, P W Gentry, E C Hawkins and wife Polly formerly Gentry, and John A Gentry to Berry L White for 60 dollars each for their four-eigths share as heirs of Allen D Gentry, decd in 330 acres of land lying in sections 28, 29, and 33, 2nd Fractional Township, R4E, being land purchased by Allen Gentry from James Jones
1866 Sep 9 Deed Bk(R-598)
Deed to Ephraim C Hawkins in consideration of 250 dollars for 150 acres of land in section 30, 2nd fractional township, R4E (described further with respect to landmarkes and the Tellico River); given by the heirs of Nancy Gentry: John A Gentry, Pleasant M Gentry, James R Gentry, Jinsey Hawkins, Nancy Mullins, Franklin Gentry, the heirs of David Gentry (Adaline McDonnell and Andrew McDonnell, Margaret White and William White, and Nancy Mullins and Asa B Mullins) and A J Mullins [Signed by all of above heirs with the exception of no signature by "Nancy Mullins" but one signature marked "Margaret Mullins"]

12. Monroe County, Tennessee, Court Records
Reba Bayless Boyer, "Monroe County, Tenn Records, 1820-1870, vol 2, Court Records", 1869.

1846 Jan Circuit Court, p.504 (Boyer, p.95)
  Nancy Gentry granted divorce from Allen Gentry, adultery.
1853 Oct Settlements, p.75,80,154 (p.24)
  Allen D. Gentry; Inventy. and Sale, and addl Sale by G.T. Glenn, Adm, 4 Dec 1854.
1856 Aug 23 Settlements, p.254 (p.27)
  Susan Gentry; sale by B.L. White; buyers include P.W., Polly, and Nancy Gentry.
1856 Dec Chancery Court, p.26 (p.132)
  Death of Susan Gentry is admitted.
1857 May 18 Folio 616 [court papers]
  Bery C Pettitt, admin of Allen D Gentry...died Aug 1853 intestate, 8 heirs--children & grandchildren:
 
  1. Malinda Jincy, dau.; wife of Richard Hawkins of Blount Co.
  2. Pleasant M Gentry of Monroe Co.
  3. John A Gentry of Monroe Co.
  4. James Riley Gentry of Monroe Co.
  5. Son David Gentry, died; his minor children are Adaline, Margaret, and Nancy Ann Gentry.
  6. Nancy Gentry, wife of A J Mullins of Monroe Co.
  7. Benjamin Franklin Gentry - summoned Monroe & Blount Co.
  8. Polly Gentry, wife of E Calvin Hawkins of Monroe Co.
1857 Dec Chancery Court, p.114,129 (p.133)
  Adm of A.D. Gentry, vs heirs creditors; James R. Gentry appt'd guardian ad litem of Adaline, Margaret, and Nancy Ann Gentry, minor defendants.
1858 May 1 Settlements, p.307 (p.28)
  Elijah Simms, Mary and Elizabeth Gentry only buyers at sale for estate of Milly Simms. [Daughter of John Simms and mother of Mary Gentry?].
1861 Jun 27 Will Book B, p.33 (p.18)
  Nancy Gentry exec; land to dau Mary Hawkins and husband E.C. Hawkins who cared for Nancy; they are to pay other heirs; to granddau Jane Gentry, to Nancy Mullins.
1861 Jul County Court, p.389 (p.59)
  Court pays for burial clothes, for Allen Gentry.
1862 Oct County Court, p.517 (p.63)
  Will of Nancy Gentry proved by witnesses.
1866 May Circuit Court, p.672 (p.116)
  William Click Jr., Charles and John Denton, and Pink Gentry of Monroe Co., laborers, indicted for murder on 10 Apr 1864 of Patrick Trotter by shooting; Mary Trotter is prosecutrix.

13. Cemetery Records
Hawkins Cemetery - was established in 1850, maybe earlier, on the Hawkins farm or possibly on land of Allen D. Gentry. Allen D Gentry, who is buried here, entered and acquired several hundred acres of land along the Tellico River. He was a Justice of the Peace for several terms, being a Justice at the time of his death. The cemetery is on the property of Ruth Hammontree and Rebecca Hawkins, about 13 miles east of Madisonville. It may be reached by following the Povo Road to road on West side of the Tellico River and there turning down the river road. There are 18 inscriptions including the following and possibly some unmarked graves.

  Mary Gentry   Aug 15, 1845 - Aug 1, 1883
  Nancy Wife of Allen D. Gentry (no dates)
  Allen D. Gentry   (no dates)
  Pleas Gentry    
  Catherine E Wife of James Gentry Oct 3, 1817 - June 4, 1885
  James Gentry    
  Polly Wife of E.C. Hawkins  
  Nancy Hawkins    
  J. N. Hawkins    

14. Census Records by Family, 1850 and after

a. Allen and Nancy Gentry
  1850 Monroe County, TN, p.100
A.D. Gentry (59 M), Susan (40 F), Margaret (16 F), William H.H. (10 M), Emaline (12 F), Pinckney (8 M), Arabecca (5 F), Catharine Elledge (sp?)(13 F) + 3 laborers
  1850 Monroe County, TN, p.100
Nancy Gentry (65 F), Franklin (22 M), Nancy (20 F), Mary (19 F), Caroline (7 F), "not named" (1 F), Angaline Alexander (18 F).
  1860 Monroe County, TN, p.268
Nancy Gentry (75F) (with E.C. Hawkins and daughter Mary - see below)
   
b. Pleasant Gentry
  1850 Monroe Co., TN, p.99
Pleasant Gentry (40 M), Jane (41 F), Salena (10 F), James [Pinkney] (8 M), Gilford (7 M), Joseph (5 M)
  1860 Monroe Co., TN, p.271
P.M. Gentry (51 M), Jane (55 F), Pinkny [Burton] (19 M), Guilford (17 M), J.A.G (15 M)
  1880 Monroe Co., TN, p.126
Pleasant (66 M), Mary (39 F), Cyntha O (20 F), Thomas A (16 M), James R (9 M),
Jane (4 F)
   
c. James Riley Gentry
  1850 Monroe Co., TN, p.101
James R. Gentry (31 M), Catharine (31 F), Jane (11 F), Nancy (9 F), John (7 M), Charles
(6 M), Riley (1 M).
  1860 Monroe Co., TN, p.267
J. R. Gentry (41 M), Lu C (41 F), Nancy C (20 F), Charles A (14 M), Ellison (12 M), Peggy (10 F), Louisa (8 F), Elisabeth (6 F), Harden (2 M)
 
1860 Mortality Schedule: John A. Gentry, 18, drowned July.
   
d. John A. Gentry (and David Gentry)
  John Gentry and 2nd Wife Mary Mullins Gentry
  1850 Hamilton Co., TN, p.433
John A. Gentry (31 M), Mary (25 F), Adaline (7 F), Margaret (4 F), Nancy (3 F), John (4 mo M) plus John and Susan Swim
  [Family missing from 1860 census]
  Mary Simms Gentry (1st Wife of John)
  [Mary and children missing from Monroe County, census]
  1860 Monroe Co., TN, p.264
Mary Gentry (44 F), Elizabeth (22 F), Mary (15 F)
  1880 Monroe Co., TN p.97
Mary Gentry (66 F), B.J. (42 F) and 8 grandchildren (oldest age 19)
   
e. Malinda Jane Gentry
  1860 Blount County, TN, p.5
Richard Hawkins (77 M), Jane (33 F), Richard (23 M), Mildred (14 F), Rosannah (10 F), Samuel (8 M).
   
f. Nancy Gentry
  1850 Monroe Co, TN (Nancy age 20, see Nancy Gentry)
  1860 Monroe Co., TN, p.287
A. J. Mullens (28 M), Nancy (33 F), John (8 M), R.A. (6 M), M. F. (4 M), J Houston (1 M)
  1880 Monroe Co., TN
A.J. Mullins (46 M), N.V (54 F), N.A.N. (19 F), A.M. (14 F).
   
g. Benjamin Franklin Gentry
  1850 Monroe County, TN (Franklin, age 22, see Nancy Gentry)
  1860 Blount Co., TN, p.5
Doctor F Gentry (33 M), Angeline W (27 F), Louisa J (6 F), Charles A (3 M), John M.F. (1 M)
   
h. Mary (Polly) Gentry
  1850 Monroe Co., TN, (Mary, age 19, see Nancy Gentry)
  1860 Monroe Co., TN, p.268
E.C. Hawkins (41 M), Mary W (30 F), N.C. (10 F), Mary A (5 F), James M (3 M), Rebecca (7/12 F).
  1880 Monroe Co., TN
E.C. Hawkins (59 M), Mary (50 F), J.M. (24 M), B.A. (19 F), N.L. (17 F), Thomas (13 M), C.M. (8 F) plus 1 boarder.

15. Miscellaneous Communications and Remarks
a. Meg Gentry Bookout, of Littlerock, CA, a descendant of Pinkney Burton Gentry, has provided help in providing data and interpreting data in a series of private communications.

b. Willie L. Gentry, of Mineral, VA, a descendant of John A. and Mary Gentry's daughter B.J., and (through Willie) Paul Garland, of Camden, SC, a descendant of their son Pleasant, in private communications have provided court references and much information on descendants of Allen D. and Nancy Gentry, most of which cannot be included here.

c. D'Andra Holt Smith, in other private communications, has provided information concerning the William E. Gentry who married Nancy V. Gentry. This includes information about William's request for a divorce, and his subsequent marriage to Martha Hancock. D'Andra observes, "In every document that I have of William E., he states he was born 1817 in NC. [In addition], everywhere my William E. went a John Gentry was sure to follow. I have John marrying in Cass Co., TX the same year as William. They both moved through Texas together. In the 1870 Lavaca County Texas census, William's proven children, Thomas Benton, Wiliam Myles and Mahala are living with this John Gentry. Two other children -Ann & Sarah are there - I don't have proof that they are William's kids. William was not in the 1870 census but I found him on a cattle drive the same year.("Trail Drivers of Texas"). John Gentry states that he was born 1815 in Alabama in all documents. I don't know the relationship between these two men [but wonder if further information could be gained in Alabama]"

d. Caroline Whitaker, at <http://members.aol.com/_ht_a/atsissie1/page/> has a detailed description of the atmosphere in Monroe County, and the activities preceding the alleged murder by James Pinkney Gentry of Patrick Trotter (see 1866 Court indictment).

e. Comments Concerning the Pinkney Gentrys. There has been much confusion in the past as to the two Pinkney Gentrys - which one was accused of murder, - which one was living with Pleasant Gentry in 1860 - which one married Rebecca Kimbrough. Thanks to the information unearthed by Caroline Whitaker, and information from Meg Bookout, this uncertainty to a great degree has been resolved. James Pinkney ("Pink"), son of Pleasant Gentry, during a time of intense rivalry in Monroe County just prior to and just after the Civil War, was a Union sympathizer, and served in a locally enlisted Union cavalry regiment. His father, Pleasant, and Peasant's step-brother Pinkney Burton Gentry, both appear to have been supporters of secession and enlisted in Confederate troop units (despite Pleasant's age). The divided loyalties are probably responsible for the fact that Pink was not living with his father in 1860. It also led to Pink's association with groups of marauding Union raiders and the circumstances of the murder of Patrick Trotter. After his indictment, Pink fled to Madison County, North Carolina where he lived until 1906, and was never brought to trial for the murder. His listing in the 1880 Madison County census was as follows: James (43 M)(TN), Rebecca (40 F)(TN), James (12 M), Eliza (11 F), Joseph (9 M), Mary (7 F), Venie (5 F), Nancy (2 F), and Ida B (2 mo F). This confirms James Pinkney as the husband of Rebecca Kimbrough. Pinkney Burton left Tennessee in the late 1860's and moved to Nebraska. His marriage to Elizabeth Scott in 1873 is confirmed by the 1885 state census listing for Thayer County: P. Burton Gentry (41 M)(TN), Lizzie (31 F)(IL), Myrtie (11 F), Iram (9 M), Harry (7 M), Clyde (4 M) + others.

f. Comments Concerning Susan Ivy. Meg Bookout has speculated that Susan's husband (or at least the father of her oldest children) at the time of the 1840 Monroe County census was a man by the name of Eldridge who was in prison at the time of the census. Susan's daughter Catherine (in the 1850 census), appears to have been named for this proposed father, and a son James, is thought to also have been a part of this family. There is no record of whether or not Susan married Eldridge, but a DAR application by a great-granddaughter of Susan's daughter Arabecca gives Susan's name as "Susan Eldridge Gentry" (which may or may not be significant). James Ivey is said to have married in 1851, but there is no census record for a James Ivy, James Ivey, James Elridge or James Eldridge in the 1850 or 1860 census record. Meg Bookout has found a reference to where Susan Ivey was the major beneficiary of her father, Burrell Ivey, but has not found when he died, or what happened to the estate.

g. Comments Concerning Rebecca Gentry McLemore. Delores McLemore, whose husband is a great-grandson of William McLemore has provided information on that family's knowledge of Rebecca Gentry (their ancestor). After Rebecca married William, she raised the son of William and his first wife, Amanda Gentry, as if her own. She is buried in the Mullins cemetery near Venore, Tennessee. [added 1/19/2007]

16. Supplement
The verbatim text of Nancy's court brief of 1854 and of the allegedly forged letter to her dated 1845, plus the text of Nancy's will can be accessed at Supplemental Text

7/14/2003 (added data, 1/19/2007)

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